Greek Avgolemono Soup

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Greek Avgolemono Soup is classic avgolemono soup that’s creamy, comforting, and bursting with fresh lemon flavor!

Greek Avgolemono Soup is the Greek version of chicken noodle soup, with the freshness of lemon juice and the creaminess of egg. It's the soup of the gods! @FlavortheMoment

Greek avgolemono soup is one of the most popular Greek recipes — perhaps you’ve tried it?  Avgolemono is pronounced “ah-vo”, which means “egg”, and “lemon-o”, which means “lemon”.  

The “g” is silent, just like in “gyro” (which most people pronounce “gy-ro”, when it’s really pronounced “year-o”).   Ok — I think today’s Greek lesson is over, even though it’s probably all still Greek to you. šŸ˜‰  

Greek Avgolemono Soup

When I was about 20 years old, there was a Greek restaurant called the Poseidon in my hometown.  It was only in business for a few years at the most, but it left a lasting impression with me.  

One of my favorite dishes was their avgolemono soup, which is the traditional Greek version of chicken soup.  The exception is the egg, which gives the soup a rich creaminess, and the fresh lemon juice, which adds a nice citrus pop of flavor.  

Avgolemono is the soup is the soup of the gods, because it’s downright heavenly.

Typically avgolemono soup is served as an appetizer, as a meal with fresh baked bread, or as a cure-all.  If you’re Greek and you’re feeling under the weather, your mother or grandmother (Yia-Yia), would make you this soup, and you’d be all better.  Simple as that.  

This soup is also served as a sauce, hot or cold, over meat and rice stuffed grape leaves (dolmades), or chicken.

Avgolemono soup is typically made with chicken and rice or orzo pasta.  I make mine with rice to make it gluten free, but the choice is yours.

Greek Avgolemono Soup is the Greek version of chicken noodle soup, with the freshness of lemon juice and the creaminess of egg. It's the soup of the gods! @FlavortheMoment

Being that there is egg in a hot soup, tempering is involved here.  You don’t want the egg to scramble.  The yolk and lemon juice are whisked together, than the white is beaten until it’s light and foamy.  The egg white is then folded into the yolk-lemon juice mixture, then the tempering begins.  

I ladled two ladle-fuls of hot broth from the soup into a measuring cup.  While whisking the egg-lemon juice mixture vigorously, the hot broth is added just a bit at a time until it’s all incorporated.  From there, the broth-egg-lemon mixture is poured slowly into the soup, while whisking constantly.  It sounds like a lot of work, but we’re only talking about 10 extra minutes that really make a tremendous difference!

Next time you’re in the mood for a good, old-fashioned chicken noodle soup, think about trying this.  It’s very kid-friendly, too.  I’d be hard-pressed to find anyone that doesn’t like the flavors of chicken and lemon, with the creaminess of egg.  

After reading this post, you can dazzle the staff with your on-spot pronunciations of Greek food during your next trip to your local Greek restaurant or festival.  I think you’ve learned a lot!  Class dismissed.

Greek Avgolemono Soup is the Greek version of chicken noodle soup, with the freshness of lemon juice and the creaminess of egg. It's the soup of the gods! @FlavortheMoment

Hungry for more soup?  See all of my Soup recipes.

More Greek recipes you’ll love:

Chicken Avgolemono 

Greek Leg of Lamb by Recipe Tin Eats

Greek Panzanella

Greek Pasta Salad

Horiatiki

Slow Cooker Greek Lemon Chicken Soup

Tzatziki

Greek Avgolemono Soup

Yield: 8 servings
Prep Time: 15 minutes
Cook Time: 45 minutes
Total Time: 1 hour

Greek Avgolemono Soup is classic avgolemono soup that's creamy, comforting, and bursting with fresh lemon flavor!

Greek Avgolemono Soup

Ingredients

  • 2 boneless, skinless chicken breast halves (about 1 pound)
  • 1 tablespoon kosher salt
  • 1 tablespoon extra virgin olive oil
  • 1 medium yellow onion, chopped
  • 2 medium stalks of celery, halved lengthwise, chopped
  • 1 clove garlic
  • 5 cups low sodium chicken broth
  • 1/3 cup white rice or dried orzo pasta
  • Kosher salt, to taste
  • 1/4 cup fresh lemon juice
  • 2 eggs, separated
  • Fresh chopped parsley for garnish

Instructions

    Prepare the chicken (this can be done ahead):

    1. Fill a large skillet about an inch high with water. Add one tablespoon of kosher salt, and bring to a boil. Add the chicken breasts, cover, and reduce the heat slightly. Cook for 5 minutes. Remove from heat, but keep the skillet covered for 12-15 minutes. The chicken will continue to cook in the covered skillet. When the chicken is done, remove from the skillet. Once cool, cut into small dice and set aside.

    Prepare the soup:

    1. Heat the olive oil in a large soup pot over medium heat. Add the onions and celery, and saute until translucent and soft, 8-10 minutes. Add the chicken broth and bring to a boil. Add the orzo, reduce heat slightly and stir. Boil lightly for 9 minutes. Add the chicken and simmer. Add salt to taste.
    2. In a medium bowl, whisk the lemon juice and egg yolk. In another small bowl, beat the egg white until light and foamy. Fold the egg white in the lemon-egg yolk mixture.
    3. Ladle two ladle-fuls of the soup broth into a measuring cup. Whisking the egg-lemon mixture vigorously, slowly add the hot broth by the droplets at first, then in a slow, steady stream until all the broth has been added. Add the broth-egg-lemon mixture to the pot of soup, whisking constantly.
    4. Serve the soup with fresh baked bread and garnish with the chopped parsley.

    Notes

    • Chicken can be made up to a day ahead and refrigerated.

    Nutrition Information:

    Yield:

    8

    Serving Size:

    1

    Amount Per Serving: Calories: 163Total Fat: 5gSaturated Fat: 1gTrans Fat: 0gUnsaturated Fat: 3gCholesterol: 72mgSodium: 957mgCarbohydrates: 14gFiber: 1gSugar: 1gProtein: 16g
    Nutrition information is mean to be an estimate only. The numbers will vary based on the quantity consumed, brands used and substitutions that are made.

     

     

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